Of all the kinds of speechmaking speaking is the most complex and the most challenging


The Different Types of Speechmaking

Speaking is the most complex and the most challenging form of communication. It is also the most common form of communication. We use it to communicate our thoughts, feelings, and ideas. There are many different types of speaking, each with its own purpose and audience.

Public Speaking


When it comes to public speaking, there are really only two types: informative and persuasive. Each one requires a different approach and understanding of your audience, but both are necessary at some point in your career. Here’s a quick rundown of each type:

Informative Speaking
With informative speaking, the goal is to simply present the facts. You’re not trying to sell anyone on anything, you’re just giving them information. This type of speech is often given in a classroom setting, but it can also be used in business settings to provide updates or report data. The key to success with informative speaking is to be clear, concise and organized. Your audience should walk away feeling like they learned something new, even if it was just a small piece of information.

Persuasive Speaking
Persuasive speaking is all about selling your idea or point of view to the audience. This type of speech is common in business settings, as well as in politics and social activism. The goal is to get the audience to see things your way and agree with your point of view. To be successful at persuasive speaking, you need to be articulate, enthusiastic and well-informed about your topic. You also need to be able to read your audience and adjust your approach accordingly.

Persuasive Speaking

Persuasive speaking is an act of presenting arguments and trying to influence the audience to accept your point of view. It can be used to sell a product, change a policy, or support a cause. The key to successful persuasive speaking is understanding your audience and crafting your message to appeal to their needs and desires.

Informative Speaking


Informative speaking is a speech meant to convey information. The purpose of an informative speech is to increase the understanding of the audience on a chosen subject. It usually is not meant to persuade or motivate the audience to do anything. The goal is simply to inform by presenting information in an interesting and engaging way.

There are many different types of informative speeches, ranging from speeches about objects, processes, events, people, places, and ideas. The key to giving a good informative speech is to choose a topic that is interesting and relevant to the audience, and then to present the information in a clear andorganized manner.

The Complexity of Speaking

Speaking is the most complex and most challenging form of communication. The complexity of speaking arises from the need to produce and comprehend an infinite number of different utterances.

The Different Parts of Speech


The parts of speech are the foundation blocks of grammar. They enable us to create sentences that communicate our thoughts and feelings effectively. Each part of speech has a specific function in a sentence.

There are nine parts of speech in English: nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, articles/determiners, and interjections.

Nouns are people, places, things, or concepts. Proper nouns (names) are capitalized.
Pronouns stand in for nouns. They can be referring to people (he, she), animals or objects (it), or be general (they).
Adjectives describe or modify nouns and pronouns.
Verbs show actions or states of being. Action verbs can be physical (run) or mental (think). State of being verbs express existence (be) or a relationship between two things (look). Helping verbs come before the main verb to show tense or intention (can, may).
Adverbs modify verbs by telling how often (often), when (now), where (here), why (henceforth), under what conditions (enough), or to what degree/intensity (very). Adverbs can also modify adjectives and other adverbs.
Prepositions connect words or phrases to other words in a sentence (to, at, in, on). They usually come before a noun phrase. Conjunctions join two words or phrases together: coordinate conjunctions join grammatically equal elements; subordinate conjunctions introduce elements that are grammatically unequal. Subordinate conjunctions introduce dependent clauses (“I left when he arrived”). Articles and determiners are either definite (“the”) or indefinite (“a”/”an”), and they signal whether we’re referring to a specific thing/person (“the cat”), several things/people (“dogs”), no thing/person (“nothing”), etcetera (“several”). Interjections are short exclamations that express surprise ,emotion ,or joy .(Wow! Oh no!)

The Different Types of Sentences


There are four different types of sentences: declarative, imperative, interrogative, and exclamatory. Each type of sentence serves a different purpose.

A declarative sentence makes a statement. It is the most common type of sentence.
Examples:
-The sky is blue.
-amazinglydeclarativesentencescanbeshortorsuperlongbuttheymustendwithapunctuationmarkusuallyanexclamationpointorperiod

An imperative sentence gives a command or makes a request.
Examples:
-Please turn off your cell phone.
-Do your homework!
-Be quiet!

An interrogative sentence asks a question. questions can also be declarative in tone but usually have a rising inflection at the end
Example:
-What is your name?
-Where are you going?

tempAn exclamatory sentence shows strong feeling or emotion. These sentences always end with an exclamation point!
Example: I can’t believe we won the game!

The Different Types of Discourse


Aristotle described three types of discourse:

  • Deliberative – This type of discourse is used to persuade people to take a particular action, such as voting for a candidate or passing a law.
  • Judicial – This type of discourse is used to persuade people to make a decision in a court of law.
  • Epideictic – This type of discourse is used to praise or blame someone or something.
    The Challenge of Speaking
    The average person speaks about four hundred words a minute, but when it comes to giving a speech, most people start to freeze up. Why is public speaking so difficult? And more importantly, how can you overcome the challenge?
    The Different Types of Audiences

    Every audience is different. Depending on the venue, the occasion, and the subject matter, you will be addressing a unique group of people with their own set of expectations. It is important to take the time to understand your audience so that you can make the best possible connection with them.

There are four general types of audiences:
-The General Public: This is the most diverse type of audience. You could be speaking to a group of high school students, or a group of senior citizens. The best way to reach this type of audience is to make your speech relatable and understandable. Use clear language and examples that everyone can relate to.
-Academic Audiences: These audiences are usually made up of experts in a particular field or discipline. When addressing this type of audience, it is important to use specific language and jargon that they will understand. This is not the time to dumb down your speech or “talk down” to your audience. Show them that you are an expert in your field by using terminology and examples that they will appreciate.
-Professional Audiences: These audiences are made up of people who share a common profession or trade. When addressing this type of audience, it is important to use language that is specific to their industry. This is not the time to use technical jargon or acronyms that only insiders will understand. The goal is to make your speech relatable and helpful for your audience members so that they can apply what you’ve said to their own professional lives.
-Special Interest Groups: These audiences are made up of people who share a common interest, hobby, or passion. When addressing this type of audience, it is important to tap into that shared interest and speak in a way that will resonate with them. Use examples and stories that align with their interests so that you can make a connection with them on a personal level.

The Different Types of Contexts


All speechmaking, whether it is to inform, amuse, enlighten or inspire, occurs in some type of context. The context establishes the purpose for the speech and provides the framework within which the speaker will operate. There are basically four types of contexts: formal, ceremonial, informal and pubic. Each type has its own set of expectations and each requires a different approach on the part of the speaker.

Formal Contexts
Formal speeches are those that take place on special occasions and require special care in both content and delivery. Weddings, funerals, graduation ceremonies, award presentations and eulogies are all examples of occasions that call for a formal speech. The key to successful formal speaking is to remember that you are there to serve the needs of the occasion, not your own. This means that your number one priority is to make sure that your remarks are appropriate to the event.

Ceremonial Contexts
Ceremonial speeches are those given on special occasions that are not primarily about communicating information or ideas. Rather, they are designed to mark an event or rite of passage with dignity and solemnity. Inaugural addresses, commencements and retirement dinners are all examples of ceremonial speeches. The key to successful ceremonial speaking is to remember that you are there to add pomp and circumstance to an event, not upstage it. This means that your remarks should be dignified and respectful without being overly long or self-indulgent.

Informal Contexts
Informal speeches are those given in everyday situations where the primary purpose is to communicate information or ideas. Conversations at work, discussions at team meetings and casual exchanges with friends all fall into this category. The key to successful informal speaking is to remember that you are there to exchange ideas, not deliver a prepared speech. This means that your remarks should be spontaneous and off-the-cuff without being too personal or controversial.

Pubic Contexts
Pubic speeches are those given in front of an audience with the primary purpose of persuading them to see things your way. Sales presentations, political rallies and fund-raising events are all examples of pubic speaking situations. The key to successful pubic speaking is to remember that you are there to win converts, not just admirers. This means that your remarks should be clear, concise and logical without being too strident or pushy

The Different Types of Purposes

The Different Types of Purposes for Speaking
Whether you are giving a presentation to your boss or teaching a class, you need to be aware of the different types of purposes for speaking. Each one will require a different approach.

Informative Speech
The purpose of an informative speech is to educate your audience on a specific topic. This could be something as simple as how to make a perfect cup of coffee or as complex as the history of the United States. Your goal is to provide your audience with new information that they can use in their everyday lives.

Persuasive Speech
A persuasive speech is one in which you attempt to convince your audience to see things your way. This could be something as simple as convincing them to vote for a particular candidate or as complex as convincing them to change their religious beliefs. Your goal is to get your audience to agree with your point of view.

Entertaining Speech
An entertaining speech is one in which you attempt to entertain your audience with stories, jokes, or other forms of entertainment. This could be something as simple as telling a funny story or as complex as performing a stand-up comedy routine. Your goal is to keep your audience entertained throughout the entire speech.


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