The ka of acetic acid hc2h3o2 is what is the ph at 250 c of an aqueous solution that is in


Introduction

The Ka of acetic acid (HC2H3O2) is 1.8 x 10-5. What is the pH at 250 C of an aqueous solution that is 0.10 M in acetic acid and has a boiling point of 88.6 C?

At equilibrium, the concentration of acetic acid will be:

[Acetic Acid] = Ka x [H2O]

Where [H2O] is the concentration of water.

Therefore, the pH at 250 C will be:

pH = -log[Acetic Acid] = -log(1.8 x 10-5) = 4.74

What is the K_a of Acetic Acid?

The K_a of acetic acid is the acid dissociation constant for acetic acid in water. It is a measure of the strength of an acid in solution. The K_a of acetic acid is 1.8 x 10^-5. This means that, in a solution of acetic acid and water, 1.8 x 10^-5 of the acetic acid molecules will dissociate into ions.

The pH of an Aqueous Solution

The pH of an aqueous solution is a measure of the concentration of hydronium ions in the solution. The higher the concentration of hydronium ions, the higher the pH. The lower the concentration of hydronium ions, the lower the pH.

The pH of an aqueous solution can be affected by many factors, including the type and concentration of acids or bases in the solution, the temperature of the solution, and the presence of other ions in the solution.

How to Find the pH of an Aqueous Solution


The pH of an aqueous solution is the measure of the activity of hydronium ions (H3O+) in that solution. The activity is a function of the concentration of hydronium ions in moles per liter (mol/L). The pH is a negative logarithm of the activity and is therefore dimensionless. The pH scale ranges from 0 to 14. A neutral solution has a pH of 7, and solutions with a pH less than 7 are considered to be acidic, while solutions with a pH greater than 7 are basic or alkaline.

To find the pH of an aqueous solution, you need to know the concentration of hydronium ions in that solution. You can find this concentration by using the equation:

[H3O+] = 10-pH

For example, if you have an aqueous solution with a pH of 3, then the concentration of hydronium ions in that solution is 10-3 mol/L or 0.001 mol/L.

Conclusion

The reason that different types of roasts produce coffee with different concentrations of caffeine is due to the fact that lighter roasts are typically roasted for a shorter period of time than darker roasts. This allows less time for the beans to release their caffeine.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *