The narrator of the frame story in the canterbury tales is


The Canterbury Tales

The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the late 14th century. The tales are told by a group of pilgrims who are on their way to the shrine of Thomas Becket in Canterbury, England. The narrator of the frame story is the fictional character Geoffrey Chaucer, who is also the author of the tales.

The frame story

The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written in Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 14th century (two of them in verse). The tales, some of which are originals and others not, are contained within a frame story and told by a group of pilgrims on their way to the shrine of Thomas Becket in Canterbury. Chaucer’s use of such a wide range of classes and types of people was without precedent in English literature, and his literary style was equally original.

The narrator of the frame story is a fictional version of Chaucer himself, who is also one of the pilgrims. The other pilgrims include a knight, his squire, a nun, a monk, a prioress, a miller, a merchant, an oxherd, a second nun, and a Summoner.

The characters

The story is set in the late fourteenth century, during what is known as the Hundred Years War. In this war, the English army was fighting against the French army. The English army was winning at this time, but it was a very brutal and bloody war.

The story is set in England, in the city of Canterbury. This city was a important center of Christianity in England. The story is about a group of pilgrims who are going on a religious pilgrimage to the shrine of Thomas Becket, who was an English saint.

The pilgrims are from all different social classes, and they each have their own stories to tell. The tales range from comical to tragic, and they are all connected to each other in some way.

The narrator of the frame story is an unnamed character who is telling the tales to his fellow pilgrims. He is a very likeable character, and he is able to keep the attention of his audience throughout the stories.

The narrator

The narrator of the frame story in the canterbury tales is the author of the frame story. He is also the author of the stories told within the frame story. The frame story is about a group of pilgrims who are travelling to the shrine of Thomas Becket in Canterbury. The pilgrims are from all walks of life and they each have a story to tell. The narrator is one of the pilgrims and he tells his story to the other pilgrims.

The narrator’s personality

The narrator is a likable, intelligent, and observant person. He is also open-minded and tolerant of the other characters’ quirks and differences. He generally looks on the bright side of things, even when he’s in the middle of a difficult situation.

The narrator’s role in the story

The narrator’s role in the story is to introduce the other characters and to set the scene for the tale that is about to be told. He is also responsible for providing the moral lesson at the end of each tale.

The other characters

The other characters in the frame story are the Wife of Bath, the Pardoner, and the Summoner. These three characters are all introduced in the General Prologue. The Wife of Bath is a wealthy woman who has been married five times. The Pardoner is a man who sells indulgences. The Summoner is a man who works for the church.

The other characters’ personalities

The other characters in the frame story have very distinct personalities. The narrator is very curious and asks a lot of questions. He is also very observant, and he notices things that others might not. The other characters are also quite unique. The Knight is brave and noble, while the Miller is crude and vulgar. The Wife of Bath is confident and outspoken, while the Prioress is meek and quiet. Each character has his or her own strengths and weaknesses, which makes them all the more interesting to read about.

The other characters’ roles in the story

The other characters play an important role in the story by providing contrast to the protagonist and by furthering the plot. The antagonist, for example, creates conflict that must be resolved by the protagonist. Similarly, the supporting cast provides information, assistance, and sometimes comic relief.


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